Humanities Lecture Series

Since 1998, scholars from the Anthropology, Classics, Comparative Literature, English, History, Philosophy and Women’s Studies departments at Queens College have presented monthly lectures to the entire THHS senior class on topics directly related to the readings done in the Humanities Seminar.

The lectures provide economic, historical, political and social background to enrich student appreciation of the texts and their cultural significance. Students interact with the lecturer during a question and answer period following the lecture and they complete a written Lecture Assignment in which they extract the thesis of the lecture, provide their notes and evaluate the lecture’s impact on their understanding of the text.

The lectures provide students with valuable opportunities to interact with Queens College faculty, to approach texts from a variety of perspectives and to stress the continuing relevance of the text and its ideas to our contemporary moment. The Assistant Principal of Humanities at THHS, Rafal Olechowski, has each lecture recorded to create a rich library of resources for Humanities students.

2019 – 2020  Faculty and Lectures

September 11: “The (im)permanence of change in the Metamorphoses”

Dr. Raymond L. Capra, Classical Studies Program Coordinator, Department of Classical, Middle Eastern, and Asian Languages and Cultures
Queens College, City University of New York

October 2: “Dante’s Vita Nuova: A Very Strange, yet Familiar Love Story”

Dr. Antonio Donato, Department of Philosophy
Queens College, City University of New York

November 6: “Transformation of Personality, Preferences, and Perceptions”

Dr. Claudia Brumbaugh, Department of Psychology
Queens College, City University of New York

December 4: “Cupid’s Broken Arrow: Lost Loves and the Unrequited”

Prof. Kelly Embree, Department of English
Queens College, City University of New York

February 5: “What the Body Knows: On Decolonial Love”

Prof. William Orchard, Department of English
Queens College, City University of New York

April 1: “Love in Crisis”

Prof. Natalie M. Léger, Department of English
Queens College, City University of New York

 


2018 – 2019  Faculty and Lectures

November 14 – Prof. Nicholas Cross (Department of Classical, Middle Eastern, and Asian Languages and Cultures, Queens College) “From Accomplice to Assassin: The Many Faces of Electra in Greek Tragedy.”

January 16 – Prof. Lee Norton (English Department, Queens College) “’Academic Conversation’: Humanities Research in College and Beyond”

February 13 – Dr. Kimberley Garcia (English Department, Queens College) “Readerly Transport: Narrative Representations of Time and Space”

March 13 – Dr. Kristina Varade (Associate Professor, Modern Languages Department, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY) “Travel Narratives and Critical Perspectives”

April 17– Dr. Alexander Moudrov (Comparative Literature Department at Queens College, CUNY) “It’s Not about the Book: Unfinished Literary Journeys of John Winthrop, Vladimir Nabokov, and Tzuo Hann Law”

2017 – 2018  Faculty and Lectures

October 4 – Prof. James Richie (English) “Frank Bidart and Lyric Fate”

November 8 – Prof. Antonio Donato (Philosophy) “Was Machiavelli a Teacher of Evil?”

December 6 – Ms. Jessica Bauman (Director, New Feet Productions) “Speak the Speech: A taste of how actors make sense of Shakespeare”

January 17 – Dr. Félix V. Matos Rodríguez (President of Queens College of the City University of New York) re: Expectations of academic research, with insights from his own graduate research.

March 14 – Prof. Lee Norton (Queens College English Department and CPP Writing Fellow) “Entering the Academic Conversation: Presenting Humanities Research in College and Beyond”

April 11 – Prof. Robin Hizme (Queens College English Department and THHS/QC Liaison) “Shakespeare’s Villains”

May 9 – Prof. Kelly Embree (Queens College English Department) “You Handsome Devil: The Aesthetics of Villains in Popular Culture”

2016 – 2017  Faculty and Lectures

October 5 – Prof. Jacob Mackey (Classical, Middle Eastern, and Asian Languages and Cultures) “Dramatic Irony: Greek Tragedy & Cognitive Science.”

November 2 – Prof. Alexander Moudrov (Comparative Literature) “The Concept of Freedom in Early Modern Interpretations of the Story of Adam and Eve.”

November 23 – Prof. Antonio Donato (Philosophy) “Virtue and Fortune in Machiavelli’s Time.”

February 15 – Professor Andrea Walkden (English) “Hamlet’s Head”

March 15 – Professor Carrie Hintz (English) “Genre and Speculation in Frankenstein and The Handmaid’s Tale

April 19– Professor Alicia Andrzejewski (English) “Denotation and Connotation: How Language Shapes Our Lived Experience”

May 3 – Professor Lee Norton (English) “Hard-Boiled Biology: When Science and Literature Meet”

2015 – 2016  Faculty and Lectures

October 7 – Prof. Alexander Moudrov (Comparative Literature) “The Story of Adam and Eve in the Early Modern Imagination”

November 25 – Prof. Antonio Donato (Philosophy)  “Machiavelli’s Ultimate Lesson: Ruling over Chaos”

February 10 – Professor Ralph Carhart (Drama, Theatre, & Dance) “Performing Shakespeare Through the Ages”

March 30 – Professor Livia Woods (English) “Social Contract Theory and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Reality and Rights in the State (of Nature)”

April 20 – Professor Karen Weingarten (English), “A Room of One’s Own, 500 Pounds, and Birth Control”

2014- 2015  Faculty and Lectures

“Socrates’ Mission and the Philosophical Life” (Topic: Plato’s “Apology”): Prof. Nicholas Rynearson (Classical, Middle Eastern and Asian Languages & Cultures)

“The Expulsion From Eden: Transgression and the Measure of Rapprochement” (Topic: Sacred Texts): Professor Deborah Gruber (Classical, Middle Eastern and Asian Languages & Cultures)

“Christine de Pizan’s Self-Authorization” (Topic: Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies): Professor Steven Kruger (English)

 “Shakespeare’s Impossible Africans, or Why Othello Should Never Be Played by a Black Person” (Topic: William Shakespeare’s Othello): Professor Miles Grier (English)

Candide: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained?” Professor Royal Brown (French Department, QC and GC)

“Social Contract Theory and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: Reality and Rights in the State (of Nature)” Professor Livia Woods (English)

A Room of One’s Own, 500 Pounds, and Birth Control” Professor Karen Weingarten (English)

“Poetic Turns” Professor Annmarie Drury (English)

2013- 2014  Faculty and Lectures

“Foolish Games: The Testing of Courtesy and Chastity in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” Prof. Kelly Seufert (English)

“Learning from History: Machiavelli’s ‘Forgotten’ Lesson” Prof. Antonio Donato (Philosophy)

“Speaking the Speech-Shakespeare on Stage” Prof. Ralph Carhart (Drama, Theatre, and Dance)

“Dostoevsky’s ‘Grand Inquisitor:’ Religion, Rebellion, and a Kiss” Professor Thomas Bird (European Languages and Literatures)

The Communist Manifesto: Context and Political Legacy” Professor Julie George (Political Science)

A Room of One’s Own, 500 Pounds, and Birth Control” Professor Karen Weingarten (English)

“Poetic Turns” Professor Annmarie Drury (English)

2012-2013 Faculty and Lectures

“Socrates & Plato” Professor Lucia Lermond (Philosophy)

“Interpreting Matthew’s Narrative” Professor Arthur Shippee (English, Philosophy, Religious Studies)

“Why is the Prince a Classic?” Professor Antonio Donato (Philosophy)

“Staging Affect: Emotion and Contagion in Othello, Macbeth, and Richard II” Professor Robin Hizme (English)

“From Enlightenment to Revolution: The Case of Voltaire” Professor Paul Schweigert (History)

The Communist Manifesto: Context and Political Legacy” Professor Julie George (Political Science)

“Nineteenth Century Imperialism: Context and Perspectives” Professor Chris Lore (History)

“Did Virginia Woolf Lean In?: A Room of One’s Own, 500 Pounds, and Birth Control” Professor Karen Weingarten (English)

 

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